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 Post subject: Re: Definition of محكم /muħkæm/ and متشابه /mutæ,ʃæ:bih/
PostPosted: 08 Aug 2011, 09:04 
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Pragmatic wrote:
I noticed this verse tonight 6:99. It uses "متشابه" and contrasts it with a similar word to describe a physical situation.

I am not sure any more that the two words are in 'contrast' rather than showing different types of the object, in view of another verse that uses "متشابه" in a similar context


In this verse, there is clearly no contrast, but just different types since the same exact word and its negation are used. It is still worthwhile to look into the meaning to see if there are any clues that can shed light on the meaning of the word as used in the verse in the OP.

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 Post subject: Re: Definition of محكم /muħkæm/ and متشابه /mutæ,ʃæ:bih/
PostPosted: 04 Aug 2012, 13:27 
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A thought occurred to me last night that I figured I should share here. If you're a mathematician and are presented with these two verses. What conclusion would you make?


Wouldn't you conclude that the look-alike verses are definitive too?

My thought is that all verses of the Quran are Muhkam (definitive). However, some are definitive on their own, while others require support to show that they are. That's where the look-alike verses come in. They serve as emphasis, evidence, elucidating parables for each other. Self-definitive verses, on the other hand, do not require such support; they are definitive on their own.

The look-alike verses must be the majority, hence the verse,


Verse 3:7 tells us that the look-alike verses are vulnerable to misinterpretation by those who wish to make their own definitive interpretation of them, that such approach leads to sedition between believers. Indeed, if God wanted those verses to be self-definitive, He would have.

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 Post subject: Re: Definition of محكم /muħkæm/ and متشابه /mutæ,ʃæ:bih/
PostPosted: 12 May 2013, 21:03 
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In his book, مباحث في علوم القرآن, pages 205-211, Dr. Mannaa` Khaleel Al-Qattaan of the Muhammad bin Saud University offers excellent analysis of the words Muhkam and Mutashaabih and shows clearly that they are NOT opposites. Some of the points he makes are:

  • Muhkam means "stopped at." It is derived from a word that means a camel won't move! It is also used for the reins on a horse's mouth which stops it from acting erratically. It is also the base for the word wisdom, because wisdom stops a person from saying or doing what's inappropriate. It is also the basis for the word "ruler" because he stops injustice and settles disputes. Dr. Al-Qattaan argues that the whole of the Quran, as explicitly stated in 11:1, is Muhkam because every word in it is deliberate and accurate. Perfected. To be stopped at and contemplated.

  • Mutashaabih means looking like each other in meaning, familiarity and excellence, suiting each other perfectly. Complimentary. Thus, the whole of the Quran, as clearly stated in 39:23, is Mutashaabih because every sentence in it fits perfectly with every other sentence, confirming it and making it clear.

  • The two words are not opposites. The Quran is both Muhkam and Mutashaabih. Muhkam because it is precise, decisive and excellent. Mutashaabih because its content confirms itself with different words, phrases and expressions which share the same meaning. There is no order, or prohibition, made in one verse that is contradicted in another, as clearly stated in 4:82.

  • As for 3:7, Dr. Al-Qattaan argues that Muhkam there means "obvious", while Mutashaabih means "not so obvious." Thus, the Quran has both. He favors the opinion that defines Ta'weel as the ultimate truth/reality known only to God. Thus, efforts by mortals in trying Ta'weel are futile.

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 Post subject: Re: Definition of محكم /muħkæm/ and متشابه /mutæ,ʃæ:bih/
PostPosted: 04 Oct 2015, 04:53 
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One more idea occurred to me and I thought I'd mention it here. The word محكم is passive while the word متشابه is active. One implication of that might be that verses of the Quran have all been made Muhkam, i.e., definitive, by God, but perhaps man is unable to see their definitiveness and thinks many of them are Mutashaabih, i.e., carry multiple meanings. In other words, verses of the Quran are Muhkam by God but Mutashaabih to the people.

This explanation may help in understanding the difference, and apparent contradiction, between the three verses we've been discussing in this topic.

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